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Baby Guide Nutrition

What should babies drink – Water, tea or juice

In the first months, babies drink mother’s milk or substitute food. Is the total fluid requirement covered? When do they need extra drinks and how much? Which is suitable at all?

What should babies drink?

The baby’s fluid needs are covered with mother’s milk or baby milk. As soon as your child receives the first food, i.e., four to six months, it is time to introduce other beverages as well as the milk gradually. Sugar and caffeine-free drinks such as water or tea are suitable.

Juice is initially not recommended because of the sugar content, especially when it is drunk from the bottle since the sugar then constantly the oral cavity rinses.  There are juices with little or no artificial sugar addition, however, are always contained the fruitful sugar and further carbohydrates. This also applies to vegetable juices.

You should avoid the use of soft drinks and other sugary drinks in babies and small children, because not only in these young years the sugar damages the teeth. Soon, small children have become accustomed to the taste and reject healthy thirst extinguishers. Dental problems are more likely to occur in newborns. 

Also, the calorie content is not to be underestimated with lemonade so that weight problems can adjust early. Of course, sometimes exceptions are allowed.

The following applies: The later these are permitted, the less tooth and weight problems are to be expected.

A selection of drinks can be found here.

Fluid requirements

Your child might drink only a little. This is no cause for concern. The firmer the food is, the higher is also the fluid requirement, and the sooner it is accustomed to the regular drinking, the more self-evident it becomes ultimately.

Your child needs about 200 milliliters of fluid a day with the first brew food. As soon as it receives three brewing times, the daily requirement increases to about 400 milliliters and with the introduction of normal food to 600 to 700 milliliters. From one year onwards, one liter of liquid per day is recommended.

Bottle or cup?

Preferably, children should drink from the cup or the cup – at least the bottle should not regularly be given for an extended period. Like sugar, the teat can harm the teeth. This is also true when they are not yet visible. Also, persistent nipples can lead to defects.

Of course, your child can not hold a cup at first. You can do this. Offer something to drink at meals and, if necessary, between meals.

Conclusion – as soon as children have no mother or substitute milk, the fluid needs to be covered elsewhere:

  • water
  • unsweetened tea
  • no caffeinated drinks
  • no sugary drinks

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